the overcompensations for misery – 362/366

Am I content?

Il Contento' illustrates an episode in the Spanish picaresque novel ‚Guzman de Alfarache‘, published by Mateo Aleman in Madrid in 1599 and issued in an Italian version in 1606. In the story, the people on Earth worshipped the god Contento (god of contentment and happiness) more than any other. Jealous of this, Jupiter sent Mercury to abduct Contento and replace him with his twin brother Discontento. Elsheimer was the first artist ever to depict this story, but he deviated from the novel by turning Contento into a female goddess. On the left, Jupiter hovers in mid-air while directing Mercury, who is seen wearing his distinctive winged hat and pulling Contento above the devoted crowd. In the background, people enjoy a variety of sports and games, unaware of their imminent `discontentment?
Il Content by Adam Elsheimer

I think I am, I am feeling much more comfortable in my own skin (again),

 

“Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn’t nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.”
~ Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

any answer at all – 361/366

What am I most grateful for?

That my transition from 2016 to 2017 was gentle and meaningful. I welcomed the new year with people I had only met once before and spent the first day of 2017 with friends from high school… then I stopped at the cemetery to visit my grandfather and I found a Ben’s Bells in the tree right next to his plot. So, I declared kindness to be my theme for the new year.

 

“I pray God it is the answer I want, but if not I will accept any answer at all and try to be grateful for what I had.”
~ Daniel Keyes, Flowers for Algernon

if you gaze long enough into an abyss – 356/366

What’s worth fighting for?

Perseus Fighting Phineus and his Companions by Luca Giordano
Perseus Fighting Phineus and his Companions by Luca Giordano

Oh goodness, I am so terrible at picking my battles that I am not sure I am fully qualified to answer this kind of question. I do know that I would fight to the death to protect my son. That is an abyss that can stare back into me and which could never win while I still live.

“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
~ Friedrich Nietzsche