Daily Archives: Friday, October 3, 2014

Day 3 – 40DOW

My prima gave me this.

I made it through the first night with the “C” word.

I slept better than I thought, but I think I woke up more often, though my fitbit says otherwise.

There is a part of me that wishes I did not have to tell anyone. And I mean anyone. That I could forge through alone, because, frankly, it would be easier for me mentally… relationships take an awful amount of energy and I suppose I want to save it (energy) for what is important,

But, I can also admit that I just won’t be able to go through this alone. I need my team. I have the core. I am glad for that.

I hate very much, though, that I find that I break down in tears, and tend to do that when I am rummaging through closets and cupboards. My friend says that she did her crying when she was in the shower.

I hate that I keep telling my son that I keep getting dust in my eye. Because I just start crying randomly… even when thinking about red-lights and changing lanes.

But you want to know what scares me the most? Telling my friends. My close friends. The people whom I would want to know if something difficult/similar befell them. I am struggling on how to tell them. Family is easy, I know they will stick by me. Extended family is easy, I know they will manage in their own way. Strangers (like my son’s teachers or parents at Squink’s activities) are super easy, mainly because I frankly don’t give a fuck what they do.

But those who fall in between nothing and genetic filial obligation… they scare me. I have started the process. I have called most of the people that I truly value, the ones I hope I don’t lose. There are a few left, but they have birthdays and other events going on, and since I don’t really know what is going on with me (in terms of what is going to happen ) and won’t until I see the oncologist, it can wait.

I wrote a friend who is on this same track right now and asked what to say, what to do, did anything work better…? And she confirmed my fear (which I knew but I was hoping that my awkward introversion was at play) that there is no right way.

She also touched upon how there is this period of not knowing, and that you don’t want to fling the diagnosis out, but then secrecy happens and people get nervous. So I think I am going to ask if I am free to emulate in a grand unveiling, if you will indulge the flourish, of what is going on with me.

I am starting to feel like I am fitting pieces together, the pieces of what I need and want in order to move through this. I know I want to proceed with rose tinted optimism. I consider myself to have my feet firmly planted in the ground and am aware of all sides of things, I want to get through this without wallowing in dark and negativity that is generated by other people. Why, do I want this? Because I know I am going to go through all these different stages and I won’t allow negative Ned’s and Nelly’s” to bring me down… I want you to lift me up, to sing with me, to smile, and say “Blair, this will all end up OK”.

So, I suppose not only am I afraid of the friends I will lose because they are burdened by a fear too great to be with me through this, but I am afraid of the friends I will chose to lose because they are too negative or pessimistic people to be around. I am still trying to come to terms with this.

I still breathe.

Day 2 – 40 DOW – was pretty shitty

Not my cells, but similar enough cells

Cancer

in-fucking-situ (I hope)

A cause for celebration. Really. They say.

But holy fucking shit, calling an oncologist for an appointment for yourself is something I wouldn’t wish on anyone, Not even someone that could use a strong life lesson or a swift kick in the butt.

You get that call. The one that gives you the pathology report and tells you next steps and it is so heavy and burdened that the air gets thick and it is almost impossible to breathe. Partly, I wonder in retrospect, if is so that you don’t miss a word about what you are being told.

The call to the overly cheerful oncology office to book your appointment.

The calls to those you love. Your husband, your mother. You aunt.

Contemplating how to make the calls to your other loved ones; your father, your cousins, your friends.

Return calls. the news spreads. You get calls from your brother, A message from a professor from when you were back in medical school (who is now a close colleague to your mother).

Priorities mulled.

Pathology reports faxed. scanned. emailed.

Decisions to be made,

Priorities re-mulled.

What do you tell your young children so they can navigate the stress they know you are feeling without giving them scary words that will make things worse.

What do you tell your friends. How do you tell your friends. Do you tell your friends? It is easier to tell strangers.

How do you navigate not knowing what the oncologist will say without Googleing yourself sick.

And again, priorities re-mulled.

Fighting the tendency to blame yourself.

Trying to be strong because you need to be for others, because the last thing you need is to take care of someone else when this is about you (and not them).

Trying not to listen too closely.

Wondering if you will lose friends. Knowing you will (I’ve worked in cancer, it happens) wondering who it will be.

Wondering what do you do. Do you burden friends with the news?

Having to deal with the part of myself that feels socially awkward and introverted.

Remembering to breathe.

Philip K Dick said that cancer was “the process of creation gone wild…”.

Thoughts of prudence and of recklessness. 
The mantra of thinking “it could be worse” repeatedly. intermittently. nauseatingly.